Monthly Archives: April 2019

Pirates of the Caribbean 5: extras, crew tell no tales of filming Johnny Depp movie on Gold Coast

Geoffrey Rush and Johnny Depp in a scene from Pirates of the Caribbean At World’s End. Photo: Supplied Johnny Depp is reprising his role as Captain Jack Sparrow for the fifth installment in the Pirates of the Caribbean series. Photo: Supplied
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It’s called Dead Men Tell No Tales but in the case of Pirates of the Caribbean 5, no live ones do either.

Local actors and crew members are on strict non-disclosure agreements, forbidding them to discuss their experiences on set, particularly on social media.

Phones are also banned from the Village Roadshow studios at Helensvale on the Gold Coast, where filming began this week.

Tight security for film production is nothing new, but the presence of star Johnny Depp, aka Captain Jack Sparrow, has prompted widespread interest in Pirates 5.

He’ll be joined on set by Javier Bardem, who will play the villain Captain Salazar.

Bardem is well known for his malevolent onscreen characters, including assassin Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men and Raoul Silva in the James Bond film Skyfall.

Geoffrey Rush is the most high profile Australian cast member, reprising his role of Captain Barbossa.

However Cairns-born actor Brenton Thwaites has also been cast, playing Henry, a British soldier.

The 25-year-old studied at QUT Kelvin Grove and starred in the Brisbane-based drama SLiDE before a stint on Home and Away.

He moved to the US in 2012 to further his career, landing roles in Oculus and Maleficent.

An official statement from Walt Disney Studios has outlined details of the plot.

“A down-on-his-luck Captain Jack Sparrow finds the winds of ill-fortune blowing even more strongly when deadly ghost pirates led by his old nemesis, the terrifying Captain Salazar (Bardem), escape from the Devil’s Triangle, determined to kill every pirate at sea…including him,” it says.

“Captain Jack’s only hope of survival lies in seeking out the legendary Trident of Poseidon, a powerful artifact that bestows upon its possessor total control over the seas.”

It’s understood official casting for extras began in October, with male actor picked instructed not to shave or cut their hair until they were confirmed as in or out in early January.

A source told Fairfax Media extras were sorted into three categories: pirates, villagers or British soldiers.

Those chosen to play soldiers were put through a bootcamp, learning how to march, hold guns and fire replica muskets.

There were concerns wild weather predicted to hit south east Queensland between Thursday and Sunday would halt work on the film.

However, a spokesperson for Pirates of the Caribbean 5 said while they hoped the weather wouldn’t be as bad as predicted, contingencies were in place and filming would continue.

Pirates 5 was lured to film on the Gold Coast last year after intense negotiations with Screen Australia and Screen Queensland.

The federal government offered a $21.6 million funding package and the then-LNP state government slashed payroll tax to fend off a competing bid by Mexico and interest from other Australian states.

Pirates 5 is set to be the biggest movie ever filmed in Australia in terms of budget and size.

* If you have information about the Pirates of the Caribbean 5 filmingor you have spotted one of the stars, email [email protected]南京夜网.au, sent a text to 0414 284 637, contact us via Facebook, or mention @brisbanetimes on Twitter.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Surfest: Philippa Anderson into fourth round

Surfest: Philippa Anderson into fourth round DAY 3: Maud Le Car waxes up for heat 9. Picture: Darren Pateman
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Maud Le Car paddles out for Heat 9.17th February 2015 pic Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Warming up. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Philippa Anderson. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Philippa Anderson gets ready for heat 7. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Jess Grimwood gets ready for heat 7. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: All the action from heat 6. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Georgia Fish. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Georgia Fish. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Philippa Anderson on her way to win Heat 7. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Philippa Anderson after winning Heat 7. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Macy Callaghan on her way to winning heat 8. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Macy Callaghan. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 3: Macy Callaghan. Picture: Darren Pateman

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Joel Parkinson. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Joel Parkinson. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Joel Parkinson. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: American surfer Kanoa Igarashi. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: American surfer Kanoa Igarashi. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: American surfer Kanoa Igarashi. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Jackson Baker. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Jackson Baker. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Jackson Baker. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Jake Sylvester. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Jake Sylvester. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Brazilian surfer Michael Rodrigues. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 2 Dixon Park Beach: Brazilian surfer Michael Rodrigues. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY 3: Laura Poncini. Picture: Darren Pateman

TweetFacebookMEREWETHER’S Philippa Anderson kept her cool to progress to the fourth round and French top seed Maud Le Car again dominated her rivals in the Surfest Women’s Classic on Wednesday.

Anderson recovered from last spot at the halfway point of her four-woman, round three heat to post scores of 8.00 and 7.57 to win with a total of 15.57.

Avoca 14-year-old Macy Callaghan earned 6.47 and 5.83 early to lead with 12.30, which was enough to defeat Laura Poncini (11.77) for the other place in round four from heat four.

Le Car racked up the highest total of round two with an 18.6 in the morning and was again the best in the afternoon with 18.70 in round three.

Le Car is the top seed after the late withdrawal of West Australian Bronte Macaulay.

Coolum’s Isabella Nichols was the other standout of round three, scoring 9.70 and 8.60 to win her heat with 18.30

Merewether’s Philippa Anderson stamped her class on the Surfest Women’s Classic with an opening-heat blitz at Dixon Park Beach on Wednesday.

The 2009 Surfest champion put together scores of 8.83 and 8.50 to easily win her round two heat with 17.33.

Central Coast’s Jess Grimwood, who won the Australian amateur title last year, survived a late scare from Portuguese Carol Henrique to take second place and progress 12.77 to 12.03.

Palm Beach’s Kiani Dobbyn was also close, scoring 11.76.

Anderson, 23, was pleased with the start in the one-star world qualification series contest.

‘‘It felt really good,’’ Anderson said.

‘‘Two eights, and it’s always really good to start off an event with scores like that.

‘‘It gives you confidence that the judges like your what you were doing out there.’’

Anderson capitalised on local knowledge and a morning of study at the site.

‘‘I was watching all morning and it was a choice of two breaks,’’ she said.

‘‘I surf here a lot and I chose the right break and it paid off, so that was lucky.’’

Frenchwoman and topseed Maud Le Car was the standout performer of the morning, scoring 9.43 and 9.17 for a 18.60 total. Palm Beach’s Ellie Brooks (12.63) also secured a round three berth from the heat.

Pro Junior champion Macy Callaghan, from Avoca, won her heat with a 12.50-point total.

Round three of the women’s contest will also be held to fill the rest of the Wednesday schedule.

Anderson is due to surf again at 3.20pm and will face Callaghan, Brazilian Karol Ribeiro and Sunshine Coast’s Laura Poncini.

Kirkconnell Correctional Centre to reopen near Bathurst

REOPENING FOR BUSINESS: Member for Bathurst Paul Toole with Bathurst Correctional Centre security manager Brad Peebles and general manager Bill Fittler at Kirkconnell Correctional Centre yesterday. Photo: BRIAN WOOD 021715jail1KIRKCONNELL Correctional Centre will reopen within months, less than four years after it was controversially shut by the NSW Government.
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Member for Bathurst Paul Toole yesterday confirmed the Government would spend $4 million upgrading the centre before it is reopened to house up to 260 minimum security inmates in 13 accommodation units.

The jail’s closure in 2011 cost 20 corrections staff their jobs and sparked loud protests across the Bathurst and Lithgow regions.

But Mr Toole would not be drawn yesterday on whether the decision to shut Kirkconnell was a mistake.

“Prisoner numbers were lower in 2011,” he said.

He said at the time the Government gave an assurance that Kirkconnell would be reopened if the prison population was to increase, and it had honoured that promise.

The correctional centre and grounds have been maintained since the closure.

“I’m pleased to see mylobbying of government ministers about getting Kirkconnell reopened has paid off,” Mr Toole said.

He said when Kirkconnell closed, 12 staff took up voluntary redundancies and 40 accepted positions at other jails, including Bathurst, Lithgow and Oberon.

Now 60 corrections jobs ranging from manager to administrative personnel will be available prior to the jail becoming fully operational by the end of June.

Mr Toole said it would be up to management to determine if this will include former staff of the Kirkconnell Correctional Centre.

Bathurst Correctional Centre general manager Bill Fittler, who will oversee operations at Kirkconnell, said he expected there to be a lot of interest in working at the jail.

“We will certainly have a big pool of people to draw from. It’s a great place to work,” he said.

“I think this is fantastic news.

“There is a real need for these additional beds as the number of inmates increases across NSW.”

Mr Fittler said upgrading work at Kirkconnell would be carried out by a combination of contractors and inmates.

He said up to 60 inmates would be relocated to the correctional centre over the next two weeks for this purpose.

Mr Fittler said there would be a strong focus on education and vocational training at Kirkconnell.

In addition, inmates will be exploring industry involvement, most likely the forestry industry.

“We will also return to doing community work with the people in Yetholme,” he said.

Attorney General Brad Hazzard said recent legislative changes and active policing had resulted in an increase in the prison population.

It meant the NSW Government had to take additional measures to house inmates.

He said the reopening of Kirkconnell Correctional Centre followed staged expansions at centres including Long Bay and Lithgow, where 635 beds were added over the past year.

WA hit with first Hepatitis A case linked to frozen berries

WA Health has reported the first case of Hepatitis A linked to frozen berries in our state. WESTERN Australia has reported its first case of Hepatitis A linked to the recently recalled Nanna’s and Creative Gourmet brands of frozen mixed berries.
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Communicable disease control director Dr Paul Armstrong said this latest case adds to at least 12 other confirmed cases across Australia.

He urged Western Australians to not consume the following implicated berry products:

Nanna’s Mixed Berries, frozen in1 kilogram plastic bags, with best before dates up to and including 22/11/2016

Creative Gourmet Mixed Berries in 300 gram (best before 10/12/2017) or 500 gram (best before 6/10/2017) packs

Nanna’s Raspberries (frozen) in1 kilogram plastic bags, with best before dates up to and including 15/09/2016.

Consumers should return any packs of these products, which were widely available from supermarkets in WA, to the place of purchase for a full refund, or discard them.

“There is no need for people who have eaten these products and remain well to see their doctor for testing or vaccination, as the risk to any individual should be very low,” Dr Armstrong said.

“Hepatitis A is a viral infection of the liver that can be passed from person-to-person, or come from food or water contaminated with the virus.

“Symptoms of hepatitis A can start2 to7 weeks after exposure to an infectious person or after eating contaminated food.”

Early symptoms are fever, nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal discomfort.

After several days jaundice can develop, with yellowing of the whites of the eyes and skin, dark urine and pale stools, sometimes accompanied by diarrhoea.

Dr Armstrong said it was important for anyone who does experience the above symptoms to see their doctor for testing, especially if they have eaten the above berry products in the pasttwo months.

“People who are unwell should also take steps to avoid spreading the infection by careful hand washing and not handling food or providing personal care to others until they have received advice from their doctor,” Dr Armstrong said.

There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A and people sometimes require hospitalisation for supportive care. Hepatitis A can be prevented by vaccination.

Most cases of hepatitis A in WA occur in people who return from travel in developing countries, where transmission is associated with inadequate sanitation and poor standards of personal and food hygiene.